Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment
21Dec, 22 December 21, 2022

Introduction

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) is the infrastructure required to charge an electric vehicle (EV). This can include everything from the cables and connectors to the ChargePoint station itself. While there are many different types and levels of EVSE, they all serve the same purpose: to give EVs the juice they need to keep going. As the number of EVs on the road continues to grow, so too does the demand for EVSE. In this blog post, we will explore what EVSE is, how it works, and its future in our rapidly electrifying world.

What is Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment?

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) is a device used to charge an electric vehicle (EV), such as an electric car, plug-in hybrid, or battery electric vehicle. EVSE can be either public or private and is typically located at a parking facility, such as a parking garage or parking lot.

Public EVSE is usually owned and operated by a utility company, municipality, or other entity, while private EVSE is owned and operated by an individual, business, or other organization. There are many different types of EVSE available on the market today, ranging from simple Level 1 chargers that can be plugged into a standard 120-volt outlet to complex Level 2 or 3 chargers that require dedicated 240-volt circuits.

The type of charger you will need depends on the type of electric vehicle you have and how often you plan to charge it. If you only need to charge your EV occasionally, a Level 1 charger should suffice. However, if you plan to charge your EV regularly or use it for long-distance travel, you will need Level 2 or 3 chargers.

Installing an EVSE at home is relatively simple and can be done by most do-it-yourselfers. However, if you are not comfortable working with electrical wiring, it is best to hire a qualified electrician to install your charger.

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) in the USA

Electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) in the United States is used to charge electric vehicles (EVs). Level 1 and Level 2 EVSE are the most common, with Level 3 being less common but found in some public places.

There are many different types of EVSEs on the market, but they all serve the same purpose: to deliver electricity to an electric vehicle to charge its battery. The three main types of EVSE are AC Level 1, AC Level 2, and DC fast chargers.

AC Level 1: EVSE uses a standard 120-volt outlet and can be plugged into any household outlet. These units typically deliver 3–5 miles of range per hour of charging and are best suited for overnight charging at home.

AC Level 2: EVSE uses a 240-volt outlet and can charge an electric vehicle much faster than a Level 1 charger. These units typically deliver 10–20 miles of range per hour of charging and are often used for public charging stations or home charging if an upgraded electrical panel is installed.

DC fast charging: DC fast chargers are the fastest type of EVSE available and can charge an electric vehicle in about 30 minutes. These units use 480-volt direct current (DC) power and are typically only found at public charging stations.

Electric vehicle supply Equipment technical standards

There are a few different types of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), and each type has its own set of technical standards. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has developed a set of standards for Level 1 and Level 2 EVSE, which are the most common types used in homes and businesses.

Level 1 EVSE uses a standard 120-volt outlet and can charge an electric vehicle (EV) at a rate of about 3 to 5 miles per hour. Level 2 EVSE uses a 240-volt outlet and can charge an EV at a rate of about 10 to 20 miles per hour. Some Level 2 EVSEs can also be used with a 120-volt outlet, but they will charge more slowly.

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has developed its own set of standards for both Level 1 and 2 EVSE. These standards are similar to the SAE standards, but they are stricter in some areas. For example, CARB requires that all Level 2 EVEs have a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), while the SAE standard does not.

All EVSEs must be tested and certified by an independent third party before they can be sold in the United States. The most common certification bodies are Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

How Does EVSE Work?

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) is the infrastructure that supplies electric energy to an electric vehicle (EV). It typically consists of a power outlet, control box, and communication interface. The EVSE charging process begins when the driver plugs their EV into the power outlet. The control box then communicates with the EV to determine the maximum charge rate and starts charging the battery. The communication interface allows the driver to monitor the status of the charge and receive notifications when the charge is complete.

EVSE can be classified into two main types: public and private. Public EVSE is typically found in parking lots, street corners, or other public areas and is available for use by any EV owner. Private EVSE is installed at a home or business and is only available for use by authorized individuals.

The majority of public EVSE uses Level 2 charging, which provides up to 240 volts (V) and up to 80 miles of range per hour of charging. Level 3 charging, which provides up to 480 V and up to 200 miles of range per hour of charging, is also available but less common due to its higher cost.

EVSE to Vehicle Connections

There are three primary types of EVSE to vehicle connections:

1. J1772: This is the most common type of connection and is used by all major automakers. It consists of a male plug on the EVSE side and a female receptacle on the vehicle side.

2. CHAdeMO: This type of connection is primarily used by Japanese automakers. It consists of a female plug on the EVSE side and a male receptacle on the vehicle side.

3. Tesla Supercharger: This type of connection is unique to Tesla vehicles. It consists of a large red connector on the EVSE side and a small white connector on the vehicle side.

Conclusion

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) is the infrastructure that allows electric vehicles (EVs) to charge. It includes charging stations, cables, and connectors.

There are two types of EVSE: Level 1 and Level 2. Level 1 EVSE uses a standard 120-volt outlet, while Level 2 EVSE uses a 240-volt outlet. Level 2 EVSE is faster and more powerful, but it also costs more to install.

Most public charging stations are Level 2. Most home chargers are Level 1.

EVSE is an important part of the infrastructure needed to support the widespread adoption of EVs. Without it, drivers would not be able to charge their vehicles.

FAQs

1. What is electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE)?
EVSE is a type of charging equipment used to recharge electric vehicles (EVs). It is typically installed in a home or public location and consists of a charging cord, connector, and control box.

2. What is an EVSE charger?
An EVSE charger is a device that provides electricity to an electric vehicle to charge its battery. It is also known as an electric vehicle charging station or charging point.

3. What is the best EVSE?
The best EVSE will depend on an individual’s specific needs and preferences. Some factors to consider when choosing an EVSE include the type of electric vehicle being charged, the location of the charging station, and the desired charging speed.

4. Is an EVSE the same as an electric vehicle charging station?
Yes, an EVSE is often referred to as an electric vehicle charging station or charging point. It is a piece of equipment used to recharge electric vehicles by providing electricity to their batteries.

5. What does EVSE stand for?
EVSE stands for “electric vehicle supply equipment.”

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